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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,740 (some duplicates have been removed)
number 1, hearing on the recent navy closure of additional areas of potential radiological contamination on treasure island. >> thank you. i know that we do have many members of the public who are here today. just so we can run through the format, we do have amy from the search department of health and treasurer from the treasure island island authorities and michael to present for the city and county of san francisco. we will have presentations first. we may have questions from colleagues, including myself. and then we will open up for public comment. and this is a time to give feedback and also questions and concerns to us on the board. and then we'll continue the conversation after that. i also want to acknowledge that many of our residents have been writing to us about the outages, the electricity outages that have been going on the island. well, that's not the subject of the hearing today, i just want to let you know that that's something that our office is working on. we're convening the public utilities commission and the city administrator's office and tida to see what we can do
into an agreement with the united states navy for the navy to provide services to the port to prepare dry dock no. 1 for demolition and disposal. >> i'm here before you to ask your approval of the resolution, which would authorize executive director moyer to enter into a memorandum of understanding between united states navy and the port to allow the navy to execute the first phase of the dry dock disposal project. so, first, very brief bit of history on the dry dock. it was constructed in 1942 for the world war ii shipbuilding and ship prepare effort. it was in use for over 50 years, finally due to excessive wear and tear declared unfit for service in 1999. as a bit of visual history, the photo in the background was taken shortly after in 2003 when the dry dock broke loose of its moorings and landed on treasure island. the picture you see there is dry dock number 1 inside of dry dock number 2, being lifted out of the water to be serviced. >> can you talk [speaker not understood], this is how far. >> where is it located now? >> yes. >> it has been at pier 50 adjacent to the maintenance shed for abou
with an earthquake and thought it would be a good idea for us to hear about the operations that the chilean navy had undertaken for helping out their citizens. we have a panel here today, we actually have two panels we're going to roll through. one is stories from the field, if you will, people's experiences in working in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way throug
and also snipers buthe they are a very small part of the navy. >> host: and the marine corps is completed the separate service? >> inside the navy but it was contentious. they've good claim they should follow the navy and ashore follow thearmy, d regulations of the army. they eventually 1832 they are a separate service inside the >> navy. >> host: how did the mission changed? of >> guest: dave remained ships guards to the 20thng as century but jack of alles trade most often as a landing party when the baby on would send silly it -- sailors and marines would participate.phibiousanding then colonial infantry inood. haiti, nicaragua, haiti, nicaragua, philippine about before world war ii started training for amphibious missions. >> host: what is the marine corps is reputation? >> not very good. c people think of them as the elite that has been validated routinely. most critique -- prestigious but a at the start of world war ii parents found them to be the most desirable. the least popular and io nationwide study.these were similar also prior. the third big guys serving. then maybe and the ar
is serving with the navy's expedition training group. while deployed in 2004, he spearheaded maritime patrol relief efforts toing the 2004 indian ocean tsunami, as well as numerous theater cooperation efforts throughout the pacific and in 2009 captain napolitano reported as commanding officer of the expeditionary training group. this is a fabulous panel and i know you're going to appreciate what they have to say. rear admiral, i think you'll start. >> first of all on behalf of the chilean navy i would like to thank so much to san francisco fleet week, particularly to admiral gary roughhead for being invited to participate in this senior seminar. it's a privilege for me to be here and to share with you the experience that we had just during and after the earthquake that we had in chile in february 27, 2010. most of the lessons learned that i'm going to show here to you is part of your concern and i'm very glad you are taking that in account so i think you are absolutely in the right path. anyway, it's a massive event that you always have to work a lot in order to be prepared. i'm going to
serve as boarding parties and snipers. but they were very small part of the navy. >> host: the marine corps is completely separate from the navy now? >> guest: they are. they are a separate service inside the department of the navy, but this became can tensions throughout the history. the core would claim when they served aboard ships that they should follow the rules of the navy, regulations of the department the navy. and eventually in 1832 to become properly a separate service inside the department. >> host: how did their mission change? >> guest: domitian didn't change so much that. they remained all the way to the 20th century, but they were something of a jack of all trades. they would do other jobs as well, most often serving as landing parties when the navy would send sailors and marines ashore in punitive expeditions. the marines for anticipating that. and the start of the 20th century they took on a variety of other nations, calling out infantry in haiti, philippines and nicaragua and just before world war ii, they started creating amphibious landing forces. they became expe
. but they're very small. it's a very small part of the navy. >> in the marine corps' completely separate from the navy now. >> dairy sector service inside the department of the navy. but this became really contentious throughout the course of history. a corporate claim and they served aboard ship that they should follow the rules of the navy, the regulation of the department of the navy. when they served assurer to the army bishop of the regulation of the army and eventually in 1832? became a separate service inside the department. >> out of their mission change? >> commission didn't change so much then. there've been ship cards offer to the 20th century, but they were something of a jack of all trades. they would do other jobs as well, most often serving as landing parties in the navy would send sailors on punitive expeditions, the marines would always participate in that. in the start of the 20th century company took on a variety of other missions, colonial infantry in haiti, philippines, nicaragua and before world war ii, they started creating amphibious landing forces. they became ex
of the chilean navy i would like to thank so much to san francisco fleet week, particularly to admiral gary roughhead for being invited to participate in this senior seminar. it's a privilege for me to be here and to share with you the experience that we had just during and after the earthquake that we had in chile in february 27, 2010. most of the lessons learned that i'm going to show here to you is part of your concern and i'm very glad you are taking that in account so i think you are absolutely in the right path. anyway, it's a massive event that you always have to work a lot in order to be prepared. i'm going to show you a short presentation where i'm going to thank that point starting from the general effect of the massive earthquake and then going down to the particular events that we've taken in care as a navy. as you see here, chile is located in the southwest coast of south america and we had an earthquake on february 27, 2010, with an intensity of 8.8 richter scale located approximately in the center of the country. the subduction zone, the area where the plate and the south a
that we've taken in care as a navy. as you see here, chile is located in the southwest coast of south america and we had an earthquake on february 27, 2010, with an intensity of 8.8 richter scale located approximately in the center of the country. the subduction zone, the area where the plate and the south american plate made contact was 250 kilometers. that means that the intensity was felt above 8 in about one-third of the country. as you can see, in the highlight color you can see the people who was affected with that earthquake at about 6 million people. that means more than 40 percent of the chilean population. in terms of energy was released, you can see there it's one trillion kilograms of tnt, that means an 8.8 earthquake. another comparison could be 18,000 times the hiroshima atomic bomb. it's supposed it occur less than two a year above 8. chili has first runner up with 9.5 with bolivia, 10 minutes duration. this one was 8.8, at that moment was no. 4, then japan next year led next year with 8.9, but it's a lot, a big amount of energy was released in just 3 1/2 minutes.
"the warrior's heart" an app adaptation of becoming a navy seal for young adultings. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. [applause] thank you so much. [applause] thank you. can i get a round of applause for will? [cheers and applause] fantastic, buddy, thank you very much. [applause] thank you. one of the things that's follow-up for me about being here tonight as gary mentioned, i'm from st. louis, good to do these things in st. louis, and i have wonderful people who shaped my life who are in the front row. my second grade teacher here with me tonight. welcome pat. [applause] i know that if this book can have the kind of effect on just one person's life that pat and my other teachers had on me, this will be a very successful book so thank you very much for being out here tonight. i appreciate. i'm going to begin the book reading right from the very beginning of the book where i asked young people to imagine themselves in the navy seal training, and this is how it starts. you stand in freezing water up to your chest. every muscle in
from the very beginning where i asked jack people to imagine themselves in the navy seals training. this is out its starts. you stand in freezing water up to your chest. every muscle in your body throbs with pain. you're exhausted beyond anything you could ever imagine, and all around you the night air carries the curses and groans of others who are getting it out like you, trying to survive the night. most won't. you know the statistics. maybe one in ten will make it through this we can survive hours, days of the punishment required to become a navy s.e.a.l. that water is dark around you, but you can make out lights on the beach. roy member your instructors words as the center toward the horizon, their voices booming over the bull horn. say goodnight to the sun. the night is going to be a very, very long night. your imagine another hundred hours of this. you see yourself plunging over and over into the icy water pulling yourself out again. you imagine endless repetition of ceps, flutter kicks, pushups. surf torture, they call it. they leave here in freezing water. not just for a f
was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the world. this was not an extravagant or hyper bolic statement t. was simply a statement of fact. it was a fact that not only i knew. it was a fact which other nations understood. even one carrier battle group had more military fire power than any other nation's entire navy, and we had two of them on the way to taiwan. so, i was confident that no one was going to challenge the fleet that we were sending there. this -- and in fact, they did not challenge it even before our two carrier battle ships arrived in taiwan, the crisis was over and the maneuvers had been subsided. this positive result was possible because of the military capability of our navy and because both carrier battle groups were battle ready and able to steam towards their destination in less than 24 hours. so, why were we able to respond so effectively? certainly one important reason, because the technology in our ships was the best in the world. the results are true, that the training and the spirit of our sailor
are trying to paint some of president obama's comments last night as anti-navy, saying he insulted the navy by talking about bayonets. factually, i don't know how that leap of logic occurs. i will talk to the governor of virginia about it shortly as well as the secretary of the navy. are you hearing that on the ground about how that's playing? obviously a lot going on in virginia with naval production. >> there's no question the romney campaign thinks it gives them a bit of an edge here. romney will be back here in a couple days and one of his stops is in the southern part of the state, the norfolk area where you have heavy military presence, big navy ports there. i talked to jerry conley, democratic congressman in this area, northern virginia, and he said come on, virginians are smart enough to know, modernization, higher technology, better technology, smaller, leaner and meaner is fine, but other privately, some other democrats say boy, the president might have had a snarky line there but it could hurt him a little bit in virginia. with things so close, just a little bit sometimes matters
morning out at ocean beach, the marine corps and the navy are setting up what's called the shock trauma platoon, a field hospital you and i might think of as a mass unit. and coming into ocean beach in cooperation with the national park service is what we call an lcac, acronym, landing craft air. it will be a demonstration of how medical supplies will be brought in by amphibious supplies during a disaster. out of lake merced, we'll be landing helicopters to demonstrate medical evacuation procedures to the civilian community. having said all that, we have a cast and characters here to speak today and we'll be available for questions afterwards. we have major general mike meyer, retired marine corps. he is the chairman of the board for the san francisco fleet week association. we have joanne hayes white fire chief, monique moyer from the port, ann crone enberg department of emergency management. and i have to emphasize the partnership fleet week has with the department of emergency management goes beyond your imagination and the work we do together to create this disaster response program
is similar to the navy. we have the installation, the regional installation command and also partners with the operational foresite. we allow the operational foresight, we maintain those but then we coordinate, cooperate, with the operational foresight once the call comes in for support. so we're able to do that obviously through memorandum of understandings and we have agreements and our wing operating orders allow for the fact the operational control, at least under operational response, maintains with the operators. the third aircraft wing maintains operational control but we send our operatives out to be controlled by the civic sight. we're comfortable with that and that's matured a lot in the last couple years. >> talked a lot about command and control and agreements and moving resources. one other question that came up yesterday we were discussing yesterday is how do communications occur specifically with regard to when we start talking about air ops and moving air resources around, how do we ensure that we have that interoperatability that we discussed so much yesterday be
of command are critical in anything that we do. what better way to showcase what our united states navy and our marine corps, our sea-going services, bring to the table in an emergency response, but recognize that they also have another mission to do, macon island just came off a 7-month deployment, this is an era when we're pivoting to the pacific. the ring of fire is also in the pacific. over 35,000 on average fatalities a year over 35 billion dollars worth of damage and we see that year in and year out with tsunamis of catastrophic proportions. today the coast guard is dealing with the debris from that tsunami as it comes ashore here in the state waters as well. just it close on admire beeman's remarks, i think it's critical not just the work here at seminar but over a cup of coffee exchanging business cards because at the end of the day it's the partnerships that mufrt endure at time of crisis. thank you to the macon island for this show of force during this third fleet week. >> i'd like to bring up the mayor of the great city and county of san francisco. what a difference he's ma
was asked that night, but at the time the navy didn't have this information. how many notice of violations have been issued to date for the navy or their contractors by our regulatory agencies? >> our understanding and our records and review of the records that we have is that the states lead regulatory department of agency, toxic and substance control hasn't issued violations to the navy or their contractors. shaw environmental, who is the navy's contractor on this work, did receive a notice of violation from the california department of public health, the agency that had been conducting these scans that we talked about, on june 23rd, 2011. these violations -- a notice of violation is a statement that says, you need to correct these problems. and all of those violations, those problems were corrected by shaw to the satisfaction of the california department of public health. >> okay. so, during this time we only have one reported notice of violation, that was to shaw, in june 2011 and they have since abated -- addressed and abated that [speaker not understood]? >> that is the information w
of the knave vie. >> and the marine corp. is completely separate from the navy now? >> >> guest: they are, they are a separate service in the navy, but it was contentious throughout the history. the corp. would claim when they served aboard ship, they should follow the rule of the navy, and when they served the army, follow the regulations of the army, and in 1832, they are a proposerly separate service inside the navy. >> host: how did the mission change in 1832? >> guest: it didn't change much then. they were something of jack of all trades doing other jobs as well. most often receiverring as landing parties when the navy would send sailors and ma reaps ashore on punitive expeditions, marines always would participate in that. in the start of the 20th century, they took on colonial infantry in haiti, philippines, and then just before world war ii, they started creating amphibious landing forces, landing against defended islands. >> host: what was the marine corp.'s reputation throughout history? >> guest: not very good.?? quite honestly, everybody thinks about the corp. today as the?
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,740 (some duplicates have been removed)